CCCR 2001 PDF

This Manual is intended for guidance only. Frequently asked questions: Q. Is the manual available in hard copy? The Internet has now made it practical to update the manual on a continual basis and thus impractical to distribute revisions by hard copy.

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For example, if the container is a fuel tank that is permanently attached to the engine or appliance that uses the fuel, then no precautionary labelling is required. The term "reasonably foreseeable use" means that a supplier must consider the various ways in which a product might be used by the general public, regardless of the original intent.

Although consumer chemical products are not intended to be consumed, the swallowing of a product by a child is considered to be reasonably foreseeable use. Another example is the common consumer practice of mixing bleach with another product, such as a toilet bowl cleaner an acid , thereby creating toxic fumes.

Portable petroleum containers and fire extinguishers must meet the stated standards. Cosmetics Section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act FDA defines a cosmetic by the following: "includes any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in cleansing, improving or altering the complexion, skin, hair or teeth, and includes deodorants and perfumes.

Drugs Section 2 of the FDA defines a drug by the following: "includes any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in a the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder or abnormal physical state, or its symptoms, in human beings or animals, b restoring, correcting or modifying organic functions in human beings or animals, or c disinfection in premises in which food is manufactured, prepared or kept.

Explosives Section 2 of the Explosives Act defines an explosive as: "any thing that is made, manufactured or used to produce an explosion or a detonation or pyrotechnic effect, and includes any thing prescribed to be an explosive by the regulations, but does not include gases, organic peroxides or any thing prescribed not to be an explosive by the regulations. Food Section 2 of the FDA defines a food by the following: "includes any article manufactured, sold or represented for use as food or drink for human beings, chewing gum, and any ingredient that may be mixed with food for any purpose whatever.

Medical Devices Under Section 2 of the FDA, a device means: "any article, instrument, apparatus or contrivance, including any component, part or accessory thereof, manufactured, sold or represented for use in a the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder or abnormal physical state, or its symptoms, in human beings or animals, b restoring, correcting or modifying a body function or the body structure of human beings or animals, c the diagnosis of pregnancy in human beings or animals, or d the care of human beings or animals during pregnancy and at and after birth of the offspring, including care of the offspring, and includes a contraceptive device but does not include a drug.

Products represented for use to keep eyeglasses clean perform a function essential in enabling the lenses of the eyeglasses to correct vision.

These products are therefore considered to be an accessory to a device and are included in the definition of a device. Denture cleaners cleansers are considered to be devices only when they are labelled with medical claims, for example, to treat, mitigate or prevent a disease, disorder, or abnormal physical state. Nuclear Substances The Nuclear Safety and Control Act, administered by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, defines nuclear substance as: " a deuterium, thorium, uranium or an element with an atomic number greater than 92; b a derivative or compound of deuterium, thorium, uranium or of an element with an atomic number greater than 92; c a radioactive nuclide; d a substance that is prescribed as being capable of releasing nuclear energy or as being required for the production or use of nuclear energy; e a radioactive by-product of the development, production or use of nuclear energy; and f a radioactive substance or radioactive thing that was used for the development or production, or in connection with the use, of nuclear energy.

This agency has also advised that self-defense sprays designed for the strict use against animals are considered to be pest-control products under the PCPA. Tobacco Products Section 2 of the Tobacco Act defines tobacco product as: "a product composed in whole or in part of tobacco, including tobacco leaves and any extract of tobacco leaves. It includes cigarette papers, tubes and filters but does not include any food, drug or device that contains nicotine to which the Food and Drugs Act applies.

Restrictions in Other Canadian Legislation: Various chemicals are restricted under other Canadian legislation. In addition, some chemicals that have been declared toxic under paragraph 64 c of CEPA are prohibited under the Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulations, for example, certain polychlorinated terphenyls and polybrominated biphenyls. This information can be found at the Chemical Substances Portal : www. For example, a prohibited weapon includes: "any device designed to be used for the purpose of injuring, immobilizing or otherwise incapacitating any person by the discharge therefrom of a tear gas, Mace or other gas, or b any liquid, spray, powder or other substance that is capable of injuring, immobilizing or otherwise incapacitating any person.

The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, adopted by all provinces and territories, establishes the safety requirements for the transportation of dangerous goods. A system of diamond-shaped placards and labels is used to identify dangerous goods. Different colours and symbols, such as a flame for flammables or a skull and crossbones for poisons, depict the dangers peculiar to each regulated product.

For more information, refer to section 1. But the reverse is not true. Answer: For the purposes of the HPA, the fact that the 1 litre container is not available to consumers through retail outlets renders these different products. In a store that sells to both consumers and industry, it is recommended that the store screen clients beforehand so that consumers do not get access to workplace products. This screening can be done by not allowing the product to be displayed on the floor, keeping the product behind the counter or by requiring the person requesting the product to show some industry identification before buying.

Credible evidence 2 A person who imports a chemical product or a container for a purpose described in subsection 1 must, on the request of an inspector, provide credible evidence to the inspector that it is being brought into compliance with these Regulations or is being exported, as the case may be.

Subsection 29 2 of the Act applies 3 For greater certainty, subsection 29 2 of the Act applies to the exceptions set out in subsection 1. An importer may bring a product or container into compliance, or may sell the product or container to another person who will bring it into compliance. Also, an importer may temporarily that is, for a reasonable transition period bring non-complying chemical products or containers into Canada to re-export them to another country.

Both product and container are included to allow an importer to bring in empty containers from other countries to be filled and packaged in Canada.

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