LEUCOMALACIA VENTRICULAR PDF

US helps in assessing the neurologic status of the child, since clinical examination and symptoms are often nonspecific. It gives information about immediate and long term prognosis. Ultrasound is a fast and bedside examination which makes it ideal for premature infants. Try to get all the information you can. Do not limit yourself to only one transducer or only one acustic window figure. Generally the large fontanel is used as acoustic window.

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Pathology It likely occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic lesions resulting from impaired perfusion at the watershed areas, which in premature infants are located in a periventricular location. It is likely that infection or vasculitis also play a role in pathogenesis. Radiographic features Ultrasound Cranial ultrasound provides a convenient, non-invasive, relatively low-cost screening examination of the haemodynamically-unstable neonate at the bedside.

The examination also imparts no radiation exposure. Sonography is sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, and hydrocephalus. On ultrasound, hyperechoic areas are firstly identified in a distinctive fashion in the periventricular area, more often at the peritrigonal area and in an area anterior and lateral to the frontal horns periventricular white matter should be less echogenic than the choroid plexus.

These are watershed areas that are sensitive to ischemic injury. Follow-up scans in the more severely affected patients may reveal the development of cysts in these areas, known as cystic PVL when cystic PVL is present, it is considered the most predictive sonographic marker for cerebral palsy.

Subsequent cavitation and periventricular cyst formation, features that are required for a definitive diagnosis of PVL, develop weeks after injury and are easily seen on sonograms as localized anechoic or hypoechoic lesions.

Progressive necrosis of the periventricular tissue with resulting enlargement of the ventricles is called end-stage PVL. Differential diagnosis.

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Leucomalacia periventricular

Publications Definition Periventricular leukomalacia PVL is characterized by the death of the white matter of the brain due to softening of the brain tissue. It can affect fetuses or newborns; premature babies are at the greatest risk of the disorder. PVL is caused by a lack of oxygen or blood flow to the periventricular area of the brain, which results in the death or loss of brain tissue. Although babies with PVL generally have no outward signs or symptoms of the disorder, they are at risk for motor disorders, delayed mental development, coordination problems, and vision and hearing impairments. PVL may be accompanied by a hemorrhage or bleeding in the periventricular-intraventricular area the area around and inside the ventricles , and can lead to cerebral palsy. The disorder is diagnosed by ultrasound of the head. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive.

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Leucomalácia periventricular

Pathology It likely occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic lesions resulting from impaired perfusion at the watershed areas, which in premature infants are located in a periventricular location. It is likely that infection or vasculitis also play a role in pathogenesis. Radiographic features Ultrasound Cranial ultrasound provides a convenient, non-invasive, relatively low-cost screening examination of the haemodynamically-unstable neonate at the bedside. The examination also imparts no radiation exposure. Sonography is sensitive for the detection of hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, and hydrocephalus. On ultrasound, hyperechoic areas are firstly identified in a distinctive fashion in the periventricular area, more often at the peritrigonal area and in an area anterior and lateral to the frontal horns periventricular white matter should be less echogenic than the choroid plexus. These are watershed areas that are sensitive to ischemic injury.

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